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MOUNTAIN RELIGION

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Image For FORGIVE ME FATHER FOR I HAVE GRINNED

FORGIVE ME FATHER FOR I HAVE GRINNED

Item Description
This riotous collection of bona fide stories and puns related to traditions of worship serves up religious gaffes in a family-friendly style. Forgive Me, Father, For I Have Grinned features amusing anecdotes of comical church incidents as well as examples of Christians who have gotten the boot for poorly chosen words uttered in front of their congregations. A section on cemeteries looks at bizarre, witty, and often brazenly frank tombstone inscriptions, such as the following: He was so cold natured; Warm in life he was not. Now it is believed he’s very warm, In a place where it’s very hot! Forgive Me, Father, For I Have Grinned is the perfect gift of cheer for yourself, your family members, or your whole congregation.

Item: 157072300

Price: $10.00

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Image For IN THE HANDS OF A HAPPY GOD

IN THE HANDS OF A HAPPY GOD

Item Description
The investigation of Primitive Baptist Universalists -- Calvinist 'No-Hellers, ' which sounds for all the world like an oxymoron -- requires the exact type of seasoned and comprehensive field experience which Dorgan has brought to it with meticulous care and insight. -- Deborah Vansau McCauley, author of Appalachian Mountain Religion. Among the many forms of religious practice found in the ridges and hollows of Central Appalachia, one of the most intriguing -- and least understood -- is that of the Primitive Baptist Universalists (PBUs). Popularly known as the No-Hellers, this small Baptist sub-denomination rejects the notion of an angry God bent on punishment and retribution and instead embraces the concept of a happy God who consigns no one to eternal damnation. This book is the first in-depth study of the PBUs and their beliefs. As Howard Dorgan points out, the designation No-Heller is something of a misnomer. Primitive Baptist Universalists, he notes, believe in hell -- but they see it as something that exists in this life, in the temporal world, rather than in an afterlife. For a PBU, sinfulness is the given state of natural man, and hell a reality of earthly life -- the absence-from-God's-blessing torment that sin generates. PBUs further believe that, at the moment of Resurrection, all temporal existence will end as all human-kind joins in a wholly egalitarian heaven, the culmination of Christ's universal atonement. In researching this book, Dorgan spent considerable time with PBU congregations, interviewing their members and observing their emotionally charged and joyous worship services. He deftly combines lucid descriptions of PBU beliefs with richly textured vignettes portraying the people and how they live their faith on a daily basis. He also explores a fascinating possibility concerning PBU origins: that a strain of early- nineteenth-century American Universalism reached the mountains of Appalachia and there fused with Primitive Baptist theology to form this sub-denomination, which barely exists outside a handful of counties in Tennessee, Virginia, Kentucky, and West Virginia. Like Dorgan's earlier books, In the Hands of a Happy God offers an insightful blend of ethnography, history, and theological analysis that will appeal to both Appalachian scholars and all students of American religion.

Item: 087049962

Price: $20.00

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Image For PEOPLE OF PASSION

PEOPLE OF PASSION

Item Description
With stories of old and new, People of Passion chronicles the lives of the Native Americans, pioneers, and mountaineers in the Great Smoky Mountains. Sometimes humorous, sometimes heartrending, and always inspirational, these stories represent nearly 25 years of research, much of which was done with a pen in hand and a reverent ear turned to an elder. Now, matching the beauty of the mountains, Carl Mays celebrates the people and the land of the Great Smoky Mountains, a place that is both God’s country and a country of God.

Item: 157072273

Price: $15.00

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Image For SHARING THE FAITH

SHARING THE FAITH

Item Description
The religion of a people is always one of the areas closest to their hearts and this has been no less true of the people of Tacoma, Virginia. From the earliest days, the church and its activities have been a central focus of the community. Compiled by Karen Peters, Sharing the Faith provides a history of the first one hundred years (1906 - 2006) of the Tacoma United Methodist Church.

Item: 000010130

Price: $17.00

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Image For TAKING UP SERPENTS

TAKING UP SERPENTS

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This is an account of the Holiness Serpent Handlers of eastern Kentucky who originated around 1910 and are, as the author points out, sincere worshippers who honestly believe that they are protected by God when they take up serpents.

Item: 086554798

Price: $19.00

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Image For THE GALAX GATHERERS

THE GALAX GATHERERS

Item Description
Perhaps no group has had such a controversial place in the literature of Appalachian studies as the home missionaries. Accused of cultural and religious imperialism, many scholars fault home missionaries for casting mountain peoples in the role of "other", as well as for partnering with economic interests to exploit the region's resources. Edward O. Guerrant, a Kentucky-born physician and Presbyterian minister, has been singled out as one of the worst offenders. For most of his adult life, Guerrant traveled the hills and hamlets of southern Appalachia, spreading gospel, building churches, and recording his keen observations of the landscape and the people. In 1910, Guerrant published The Galax Gatherers: The Gospel among the Highlanders, an account of these travels. Reissued here for the first time, The Galax Gatherers is a fascinating look at Guerrant's beliefs, prejudices, and vision for a people "left behind" by the modern world. Guerrant's interest in Appalachia began when he served as a soldier in the Confederate army, during which time he traveled the mountains of southwestern Virginia, easternTennessee, and eastern Kentucky. When the war ended in 1865, he began training to become a medical doctor, eventually setting up practice near Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, where population was sparse. But Guerrant was just as interested in saving the souls of his mountain neighbors as their bodies; in 1873 he went to seminary, and by 1877 he was named to the Presbyterian Church's Home Missions Committee. So began Guerrant's famously contentious career as a mountain missionary. Using his medical expertise to entice followers, Guerrant recruited nearly three thousand new Church members in his first four-year term as "Synodical Evangelist", organized twenty-five congregations, and built fifteen houses of worship. In 1897, Guerrant founded the Society of Soul Winners, a non-denominational organization that trained ministers and teachers for mountain work and constructed churches, mission schools, colleges, an orphanage, and a hospital. In a new introduction to the text, Mark Huddle notes that the lingering picture of Guerrant is more complex than scholars have heretofore acknowledged. The Galax Gatherers is the story of the mountain missionaries in the words of one of their own and an absorbing record of early twentieth-century Appalachian life.

Item: 157233363

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